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20th Century American Women Activists 2022 Best

20th Century American Women Activists.

This paper explores 20th Century American Women Activists. For your second formal history paper, select an individual or organization featured in Units 3, 4, or 5, who took civic action to fix one of the specific social, economic, or political problems featured in the units.

20th Century American Women Activists.

Due December 12th For your second formal history paper, select an individual or organization featured in Units 3, 4, or 5, who took civic action to fix one of the specific social, economic, or political problems featured in the units. Clearly identify and describe the single problem or issue around which they organized and acted. Then summarize, discuss, and compare the strategies and ideas they developed to fix the problem. What goals did they achieve? How were their views and work affected by their “social location”—their race, class, gender identity, ethnicity? What impact did they have on the course of history? What historical lesson/s about civic engagement do they offer us?

20th Century American Women Activists.

For paper 2, select a social problem & Individual or groups covered in Units 3, 4, 5– week 10-16. You should draw primarily from assigned course materials. Use both primary sources and secondary scholarship to support your discussion and assertions. You are encouraged to draw on relevant materials from the Women and Social Movements in the U.S., Database linked in the course E-Reader, and use assigned readings as a starting point. For general biographical information about individuals, reference the authoritative biographical dictionary, Notable American Women: A Biographical Dictionary, Volumes 1-5 (Cambridge: Belknap Press of Harvard University).

20th Century American Women Activists.

Physical copies of each volume available in our library. Please avoid non-scholarly web-based sources such as history.com. **** Writing Guidelines & Expectations: AWAI papers should follow the conventions of good academic writing! Your AWAI papers should have an introduction, body paragraphs, and a conclusion. Start your paper with an overarching topic sentence that immediately identifies the main focus of your paper—the social problem and activists you will feature. In your introduction, you should provide adequate historical context to orient the reader. (ie. some dates, terms, and a sense of what changed over time on this topic).

20th Century American Women Activists.

You should close the introduction with a thesis statement–a supportable generalization/big assertion about what the bulk of the evidence examined about your chosen civic activist/s proves about how they worked to solve the social problem. Organize the rest of your response into 7-10 well-developed paragraphs each containing a topic sentence that identifies your main idea in that paragraph, followed by supporting evidence from the course materials, and your own explanations of that material. Offer your own thoughts and evaluation of this evidence.

20th Century American Women Activists.

Remember that your supporting body paragraphs are supposed support what you asserted in your thesis statement in the introduction, while also adequately describing and contextualizing the work of these civic activists. If these groups or individuals worked in collaboration with, or were in conflict with others, that should be explained. Your conclusion should explain how you’ve proven your main argument and offer some reflection on the historical significance and impact of the civic activists you wrote about. What lesson/s about the historic role of women’s civic and social activism in American history will you take with you after studying this topic?

20th Century American Women Activists.

Format, Length, Stylistic, and Citation Requirements The Basics: Your paper should be 5-7 pages, double-spaced, 12 Pt. Times New Roman Font, standard black ink, standard 1” margins. Your prose should be crisp, clear, grammatical, and properly punctuated. Avoid unnecessary adjectives, adverbs, or flowery, fancy language. Be sure your sentences have a subject, verb, and object. Avoid passive voice, where its not clear who did or said what. Practice “economy of language.” Alert! You are writing a social science paper in the academic discipline of history. You should be writing in the past tense.

20th Century American Women Activists.

Keep your language as formal as possible. MOSTLY, avoid the use of first person singular, “I” and “My” statements. Avoid touch-feely, self-dismissing language. For example, “I feel like …” or “It might just be my opinion, but…” are two commonly bad ways to start a sentence in a formal academic paper. Don’t undercut the force of your assertions by admitting your ideas are based primarily on feelings or opinions rather than evaluation of evidence. Instead, make the historical subjects you are writing about THE subjects of your paper and your sentences. Similarly, make the evidence the basis of your assertions and statements. https://youtu.be/jNeZzoUYJUM

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Family Genogram Project 2022 Best

Family Genogram Project

The focus of this Family Genogram Project will be on family strengths and resilience, family patterns, rules or ways of being, and the overall health of the family.

Family Genogram Project

Instructions Building Your Family Genogram Part I (GenoPro Genogram Software) A genogram (pronounced: jen-uh-gram) is “a pictorial representation of family relationships across several generations. It is a convenient organizing device to help you identify family patterns or develop hypotheses about family functioning” (GenoPro.com). The genogram resembles a family tree; however, it includes additional relationships among individuals. This instrument facilitates the practitioner and his client’s identification of an understanding of patterns in family history.

Family Genogram Project

The genogram also does a better job than a pedigree chart in mapping out relationships and traits. Even though there are a plethora of books and websites on the subject of genograms, it is worth noting that Monica McGoldrick and Randy Gerson are responsible for its initial development and popularity in clinical settings. The structure of a genogram is by and large determined by the imagination and creativity of its author. Some of the most common features on a genogram are information related to the number of families, children in a given family, and the birth order of the family members—including the number of births and deaths.

Family Genogram Project

Index Person: In constructing the genogram, identify yourself as the “index person” and complete the genogram on your family. Focus: The focus of this genogram will be on family strengths and resilience, family patterns, rules or ways of being, and the overall health of the family. Of course, you should also address any issues and concerns that may be discovered; however, do not make the genogram problem-focused, even though this is typically how it is used in counseling. Construction: You will submit your genogram through the assignment manager via GenoPro, found by clicking the “assignments” button. This submission will come in as a GenoPro document.

Family Genogram Project

You will also need to attach your narrative on a Microsoft Word document. Make sure to include the following items: · Two preceding generations—that is, the genogram must include the index person, his/her parents, and his/her grandparents (3 generations, in all). It would also be imperative that, in the event of the index person being involved in a marital or significant relationship, mention must be made of the significant other involved, including their immediate family such as their parents, siblings, and children. In the case where the index person is either a parent or a grand-parent, his/her children must be included in the genogram.

Family Genogram Project

Use the symbols as illustrated within the GenoPro software to indicate the nature of many of the relationships among family members. Be sure to indicate yourself as the index person by drawing a double circle or double square around yourself. Do not forget to include the current date on your genogram. · Use the relationship lines to indicate significant relationships within the family system. Do not use the “normal” line provided by GenoPro. This only crowds the graphic and makes it difficult to read. · Include a legend at the bottom-right corner of the genogram document. The legend must only include items represented on the genogram.

Family Genogram Project

In order to make it easy to understand, ensure that there are notes on the genogram graphic regarding people, family events, etc., in their appropriate places (for example, on the side of a relevant person or generation). Even though this is not required for the successful completion of the assignment, it may be helpful to interview other family members about important areas of their family history. It would also be a good idea to include labels (a word or two will do) about each family member’s strengths—especially those that are either known by the index person or have a relevant connection to them.

Family Genogram Project

GenoPro gives you the freedom you need to manipulate your genogram to allow enhanced viewing on a computer system. You can shorten or lengthen lines, move entire family units around to maximize space, and more. Your objective is to work with the graph to create a genogram that is easy to view and can be understood at a glance. Analysis: Once you have completed your genogram, you will need to interpret your family map. Analyze the genogram and who you are in the context of the family based on race/ethnicity, culture, class, gender, spiritual tradition, family life cycle, etc. https://youtu.be/Zn_jfTImacM

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